Papers in Education and Development

Papers in Education and Development is dedicated to the analysis of educational problems and issues from a multidisciplinary point of view. Contributions are invited from authors in a variety of academic disciplines whose work has significant implications for educational policy and/or educational practice both in sub-Saharan Africa and beyond. The Editorial Board accepts research-based analytical papers, original research reports, reviews and short communications.


EDITORIAL BOARD MEMBERS


Chief Editor


Eustella P. Bhalalusesa, Associate Professor, Department of Educational
Foundations, Management and Lifelong Learning, University of Dar es
Salaam, Tanzania


Associate Editors


Blackson Kanukisya, Senior Lecturer, Department of Educational Foundations,
Management and Lifelong Learning, University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Philipo Lonati Sanga, Senior Lecturer, Department of Educational Foundations,
Management and Lifelong Learning, University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania


Editorial Board Members (Domestic)


William A.L. Anangisye, Professor, Department of Educational Foundations,
Management and Lifelong Learning, University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Rebeca Sima, Senior Lecturer, Department of Educational Psychology and
Curricullum Studies, University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
George Kahangwa, Senior Lecturer, Department of Educational Foundations,
Management and Lifelong Learning, University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Albert Tarmo, Lecturer, Department of Educational Psychology and Curricullum
Studies, University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Mpoki Mwaikokesya, Lecturer, Department of Educational Foundations,
Management and Lifelong Learning, University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Stephen Mabagala, Senior Lecturer, Department of Physical Education and Sport
Sciences, University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Nkanileka Loti Mgonda, Senior Lecturer, Department of Educational Foundations,
Management and Lifelong Learning, University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Rose Upor, Senior Lecturer, Department of Foreign Languages and Linguistics,
University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania




Editorial Board Members (International)


Maria Hallitzky, Professor, Faculty of Education, University of Leipzig, Germany
Hanna Posti-Ahokas, Senior Researcher, Faculty of Education and Psychology,
University of Jyvaskyla, Finland
Elina Lehtomaki, Professor, Faculty of Education, University of Oulu, Finland
Editorial Advisory Panel (International)
Abel Ishumi, Professor Emeritus, School of Education, University of Dar es
Salaam, Tanzania
Daniel Sifuna, Professor, Department of Educational Foundations, Kenyatta
University, Kenya
Peter Baguma, Professor, Department of Organisational and Social Psychology,
Makerere University, Uganda
Francis Indoshi, Professor, School of Education, Maseno University, Kenya
Des Hewitt, Professor, School of Education, University of Warwick, UK


Editorial Correspondence


Editorial correspondence including manuscripts for submission should be sent to
The Chief Editor or Associate Chief Editors, Papers in Education and Development
(PED), School of Education, University of Dar es Salaam, P.O. Box 35048, Dar es
Salaam, Tanzania. Authors are advised to submit their papers in electronic form,
as an attachment, to email papersineducation@gmail.com, copied to ped@udsm.
ac.tz. Journal Website: http://ped.ac.tz


Editorial


Welcome to this issue, Volume 39, Number 2 of the Papers in Education and
Development (PED). In this issue, we provide a collection of scholarly researchbased
papers that address current concerns of education from different countries
in Africa. A total of ten papers are included in this issue. The first paper is on adult
learning and education followed by two papers on higher education, four papers
on secondary education, two papers on primary education and the final one on
pre-primary education.


The first paper is written by Sumani, Kanukisya and Mwaikokesya and its focus is
on examining the learning processes undertaken by small-scale farmers in Uganda
to navigate their way through the challenges of achieving innovative farming
practices. Findings of this research revealed that farmers’ learning process did not
follow a fixed pattern, but slightly varied depending on the source of learning. The
authors recommend that agencies offering non-formal farmer education ought to
adopt approaches that can enable farmers to learn by reflecting on their experiences
in order to challenge the status quo.


In the second paper, Timothy, Kyaruzi, Mwakabenga and Rukondo investigated
how pre-service science and Mathematics teachers improve their competence-based
teaching when they are engaged in educative mentorship in a school attachment
intervention. The findings indicated that the intervention enhanced pre-service
teachers’ knowledge and skills in competence-based teaching. Based on these
findings, the authors recommend that teacher training colleges, researchers and
policy makers should integrate the school attachment strategy in the initial teacher
education to promote competence-based teaching.

In the next paper, Nziku,
Kahangwa and Mabagala explore the benefits of internationalisation through
mobility of students and academic staff at the University of Dar es Salaam (UDSM).
The findings revealed that mobility of students and academic staff enhanced
global knowledge acquisition, generation of income, international co-authorship
and cultural exchange. The paper recommends that UDSM ought to strengthen
the implementation of internationalisation activities through various strategies.

Moving away from higher education subsector, the fourth paper by Peter, Maro
and Nzima focuses on how early career secondary school teachers socialise and
cope with their teaching roles. Findings revealed that, in Tanzania, Early Career
Teachers (ECTs) need induction, mentoring, collaborative work environment and
development of compentences in instructional planning and teaching approaches.
It is recommended that ECTs should be provided with more professional and
social support for them to cope with contextual factors and become effective in
accommodating teaching and other professional responsibilities in school.

In the
next paper, Olatunji and Kolawole determined what contribution gender could
make to Nigerian students’ disposition to and performance in essay writing when
exposed to computer-assisted language instructional strategies. The findings showed
that gender had significant effect on the students’ disposition to and significant
effect on the students’ achievement in computer-assisted essay writing. Based
on these findings, it was recommended that gender factors should be taken into
serious consideration when deciding to employ computer-assisted essay writing
instructions to maximise the benefits of the strategy.


The sixth paper is about financial sustainability of fee-free secondary education
in Tanzania. In this paper, Shemwelekwa and Kahangwa examine the financial
sustainability in the provision of secondary education through a fee-free education
policy in Tanzania. Among others, the findings indicate that financial sustainability of
fee-free secondary education relies on the national financial and strategic planning.
As one survival strategy, this study recommends schools to establish various income
generating projects.

The seventh paper by Rehema Mwakabenga reports findings
from an action research that was conducted to investigate how four secondary
school teachers enhanced their ability to participate in a teacher-led professional
learning. The most important finding indicated that in the course of implementing
the study, the teachers learned to carry out systematic action research as a form
of professional learning that impacted their classroom practices. Although, the
findings reported in this paper cannot be generalized, the experiences of the four
teachers provide some insights to other teachers and educational leaders on the
use of action research.
After the four papers on secondary education, the eighth and ninth papers focus on
primary education. The eighth paper is by Ndeskoi which assesses the acquisition
of environmental education among primary school pupils in Moshi Rural district in
Tanzania. The paper is based on a study that employed a mixed methods research
approach. The results showed that majority of pupils had average knowledge
and awareness of environmental issues. The study concludes that envionmental
education acquired in schools is indispensable for creating environment-related
knowledge in life. The ninth paper is written by Manara and it examines the
relationship between school autonomy (SA) and collective action in primary school
committees (CASC) in Arusha City and Iringa District. The findings confirmed
an assumption that school autonomy (SA) is related to collective action in school
committees CASC across rural and urban settings of school committees.
The final paper on this issue is on pre-primary education which is written by
Mabagala. Mabagala’s paper is based on the effects of perceived quality of service
dimensions on parents’ satisfaction with pre-primary education in Dar es Salaam
region. The results of this study confirmed that the quality of pre-primary education
service is indeed a significant predictor of parents’ satisfaction.
On behalf of the Editorial Board, I hope that you will find this issue very stimulating
and worthwhile reading. Accordingly, we cordially request for your valuable
feedback to improve the quality of this journal. Once again, heartfelt thanks are
due to such devoted editorial board members and our esteemed peer reviewers,
authors and readers.


Eustella P. Bhalalusesa


Chief Editor of Papers in Education and Development



CONTENTS


Defying the Odds to Learn Innovative Farming in Uganda:
Experiences of Small-Scale Farmers from Bududa District
Michael David Sumani, Blackson Kanukisya,
and John Mpoki Mwaikokesya........................................................................... 1
Enhancing Pre-Service Science and Mathematics Teachers’
Competence-based Teaching through School Attachment
Venance Timothy, Florence Kyaruzi, Rehema Mwakabenga
and Nyanjiga Rukondo.................................................................................... 19
Benefits of Internationalisation of Higher Education through
Mobility of Students and Academic Staff in Tanzania:
Case of University of Dar es Salaam
Constancia Nziku, George Kahangwa and Stephen Mabagala............................... 40
Professional Socialisation of Early Career Secondary
School Teachers in Tanzania
Levina Peter, Wadrine Maro and Ibrahimu Nzima................................................ 60
Gender Differences in the Outcomes of Computer-Assisted Language
Instructional Strategies in Essay Writing: Case of Senior
Secondary Classes in Ilorin City, Nigeria
Samson Olusola Olatunji and Clement Olusegun Olaniran Kolawole....................... 80
Examining Financial Sustainability of Fee-Free Secondary
Education in Tanzania
Rogers Jacob Shemwelekwa and George Kahangwa............................................. 96
Secondary School Teachers’ Experiences of Using Action
Research in Classroom Practices
Rehema Japhet Mwakabenga.......................................................................... 119
Papers in Education and Development Volume 39, Number 2 of 2021 ix
Indexed by African Journals Online (AJOL)
Primary School Pupils’ Acquisition of Environmental Education in
Moshi Rural District in Tanzania
Thaudensia Ndeskoi....................................................................................... 140
Primary School Autonomy and Collective Action in School C
ommittees in Arusha City and Iringa District
Kenny Manara................................................................................................ 157
Perceived Effects of Quality of Pre-Primary Education
Services on Parents’ Satisfaction in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Daphina Libent-Mabagala................................................................................ 178
PED EDITORIAL POLICY AND NOTES FOR CONTRIBUTORS.................................... 192